PV energy for   the future

        JA zu
    Photovoltaik

JA zur Windkraft



   









































Greece  - GRIECHENLAND 


Greece, with 10,72 million people, is a country that also includes a thousend islands in the Aegean and Ionian Seas. Because of its influential role in antiquity, Greece is often refered  to as the cradle of western civilization. The Greek capital Athens with 3,2 million inhabitants (2020) Landmatks such as the Acropolis, a City fortress from the 50th Century BC. with the Panthenon Temple. Greece is also a well-known destination for beach holidays - from the black sands of Santorini to the party scene of Mykonos. 

As a sunny country, Greece offers ideal conditions for the use of photovoltaics. After a long phase of stagnation, the expansion of solar energy in Greece has been gaining momentum again since 2017. Enormous market growth with a boost in performance was observed last year. This is accompanied by an increase in electricity generation from photovoltaic systems

At the beginning of 2022, electricity with a capacity of more than 3,000 MW was fed into the Greek electricity grid for the first time, according to data from the European grid operator ENTSOE. The 2,000 MW solar capacity mark was exceeded for the first time in 2020.  

The reason for this performance record is the high growth rate in installed PV power. At the end of 2020, photovoltaic systems with a total output of around 3,300 MW were in operation in Greece. Also in the current year 2022 the positive market trend continued. 

The government wants to rely on wind, sun and hydrogen in the future and is accelerating the pace on the way there

The sun shines more than 300 days a year, while the refreshing wind blows on the 3,054 islands and along the more than 13,000 km of coast: very good conditions for generating electricity from renewable sources. The government of the Mediterranean country would like to use this enormous potential and push ahead with the energy transition in the 2020s. With an ambitious climate law, Parliament wants to accelerate the expansion of wind power and solar systems. In industry, hydrogen will soon replace fossil fuels on a large scale. A project that the European Union wants to support with billions in funding, including from Corona reconstruction aid. 

Economic recovery and early phase-out of coal  

The energy system is in the midst of a fundamental change, because until now the country was heavily dependent on fossil energy sources: in 2010 they accounted for more than 80 percent of domestic electricity production, more than half of the electricity came from coal-fired power plants. The expansion of renewables was initially sluggish - also because the economic crisis was to occupy the southern European state for a long time. The burden of debt and the associated austerity measures left little scope for investment. 

However, when the economic situation eased again in recent years, the government focused on the energy transition by using the aid money to initiate comprehensive structural change. This also includes phasing out coal-fired power generation. Since 2014, the share of electricity generation has fallen constantly and was only 15 percent in 2020 - a decrease of more than two thirds. The resulting gap is mainly filled by natural gas. Since 2014, the kshare in the electricity mix has increased from 13 to almost 37 percent. But renewable sources are also gaining in importance: Wind and solar together have climbed from 15 to 27 percent over the same 

Electricity generation 2020 in percent

On the other hand, the share of oil in the energy and power supply has remained constant for years. There are structural reasons for this: Greece has always been heavily dependent on imports, especially when it comes to fossil raw materials, since domestic reserves are limited. According to IEA data, in 2010 only 34 percent of the primary energy consumption, ie the energy consumption of all sectors including electricity supply, was generated in the Mediterranean country. Coal, gas and oil, mainly from Russia, Iran and Saudi Arabia, accounted for 96 percent of the energy imported. Although the country now purchases significantly less coal from abroad, the amount of oil has remained almost unchanged. With the expansion of renewables, this dependency should also decrease. 

Less coal is also the declared goal for regions far from the coast: Originally, the last power plant was supposed to go offline in 2028. However, as part of the post-Covid-19 recovery program "Greece 2.0", Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis announced a new goal at the end of April 2021. Now, by 2025, there should finally be an end to coal, and most of the power plants will be shut down by 2023. 

Massive expansion of wind power and solar capacities

However, in order to achieve the goals of the National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP), more must happen : the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the entire energy sector to zero by 2050. To achieve this, renewables must grow rapidly and massively. It was only at the beginning of 2021 that Parliament tightened up the Climate Protection Act again. In 2030, 67 percent – ​​instead of the previously planned 61 percent – ​​of the electricity consumed should come from renewable sources. Most recently, the value was just under the 30 percent mark and thus slightly lower than for domestically generated electricity - the reason for the discrepancy is energy imports. In a speech at an energy conference in January, Alexandra Sdoukou, Secretary General for Energy and Mineral Resources, calculated what the target means in concrete terms: “Today, around 10.5 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy are in operation. To reach the NECP targets we need 19 GW by 2030. We need to add 8.5 GW over the next decade, an average of 850 megawatts (MW) per year. 

In order to achieve the goals of the National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP), however, more must happen: the aim is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the entire energy sector to zero by 2050. To achieve this, renewables must grow rapidly and massively. It was only at the beginning of 2021 that Parliament tightened up the Climate Protection Act again. In 2030, 67 percent – ​​instead of the previously planned 61 percent – ​​of the electricity consumed should come from renewable sources. Most recently, the value was just under the 30 percent mark and thus slightly lower than for domestically generated electricity - the reason for the discrepancy is energy imports. In a speech at an energy conference in January, the Secretary General for Energy and Mineral Resources, Alexandra Sdoukou, calculated what the target means in concrete terms: “Today, around 10.5 gigawatts (GW) of renewable energy are in operation. To reach the NECP targets we need 19 GW by 2030. We need to add 8.5 GW over the next decade, an average of 850 megawatts (MW) per year.” 

We support these measures and such an expansion of renewable energies and would like to make an important contribution to the implementation of the energy transition. There is still great potential here that has not yet been exhausted.  

Here, too, we have several larger projects in the field of wind and solar energy in our portfolio and are looking for suitable partners as an investor, just talk to us


Solarparks fressen Ackerland: Bauern verlieren große Flächen | agrarheute.com


        

Griechenland mit 10,72 Millionen Menschen ist ein Staat, der auch tausende Inseln im Ägäischen und Ionischen Meer umfasst. Aufgrund seiner einflussreichen Rolle in der Antike wird Griechenland oft als Wiege der westlichen Zivilisation bezeichnet. Die griechische Hauptstadt Athen mit 3,2 Mio. Einwohner (2020) beherbergt Wahrzeichen wie die Akropolis, eine Stadtfestung aus dem 5. Jh. v. Chr. mit dem Parthenon-Tempel. Griechenland ist auch ein bekanntes Reiseziel für Strandurlaube – vom schwarzen Sand auf Santorin bis zur Partyszene auf Mykonos.  


Griechenland als Sonnenland bietet ideale Bedingungen für die Nutzung von Photovoltaik. Nach einer längeren Phase der Stagnation gewinnt der Ausbau der Solarenergie in Griechenland seit 2017 wieder an Dynamik. Ein enormes Marktwachstum mit einem Leistungsschub war im letzten Jahr zu beobachten. Damit einhergehend steigt die Stromerzeugung aus Photovoltaik-Anlagen.


Anfang 2022 wurde in Griechenland erstmals Strom mit einer Leistung von über 3.000 MW in die griechische Stromnetze eingespeist, so die Daten des europäischen Netzbetreibers ENTSOE, die Marke von 2.000 MW Solarleistung wurde erstmals im Jahr 2020 überschritten.


Grund für diesen Leistungsrekord sind hohe Zuwachsraten bei der installierten PV-Leistung. Ende 2020 waren in Griechenland Photovoltaik-Anlagen mit einer Gesamtleistung von rund 3.300 MW in Betrieb. Auch im laufenden Jahr 2022 Jahr setzte sich der positive Markttrend fort. 


Die Regierung will künftig auf Wind, Sonne und Wasserstoff setzen und zieht auf dem Weg dahin das Tempo an.


Die Sonne scheint an über 300 Tagen im Jahr, dazu bläst auf den 3054 Inseln und entlang der mehr als 13.000 Kilometer langen Küste erfrischend der Wind : Sehr gute Bedingungen also für die Stromerzeugung aus regenerativen Quellen. Die Regierung des Mittelmeerstaates möchte dieses enorme Potential nutzen und die Energiewende noch in den 2020er Jahren ordentlich vorantreiben. Mit einem ehrgeizigen Klimagesetz will das Parlament dazu den Ausbau von Windkraft- und Solaranlagen beschleunigen. In der Industrie soll Wasserstoff schon bald im großen Stil fossile Brennstoffe ersetzen. Ein Vorhaben, das die Europäische Union mit Fördergelder in Milliardenhöhe, unter anderem aus Corona-Wiederaufbauhilfen unterstützen möchte.


Wirtschaftlicher Aufschwung und frühzeitiger Kohleausstieg

Das Energiesystem steckt inmitten eines grundlegenden Wandels, denn bisher war das Land stark von fossilen Energiequellen abhängig : 2010 hatten sie einen Anteil von mehr als 80 Prozent an der inländischen Stromproduktion, über die Hälfte des Stroms kam aus Kohlekraftwerken. Der Ausbau der Erneuerbaren verlief zunächst schleppend – auch, weil damals die Wirtschaftskrise den südeuropäischen Staat lange beschäftigen sollte. Die Schuldenlast und die damit verbundenen Sparmaßnahmen ließen nur wenig Spielraum für Investitionen.

Als sich die wirtschaftliche Lage in den vergangenen Jahren wieder entspannte, legte die Regierung den Fokus jedoch auf die Energiewende, indem sie die Hilfsgelder nutzte, um einen umfassenden Strukturwandel anzustoßen. Dazu gehört auch der Ausstieg aus der Kohleverstromung. Seit 2014 ist der Anteil an der Stromerzeugung so konstant gesunken und lag 2020 nur noch bei 15 Prozent – ein Rückgang um mehr als zwei Drittel. Die dadurch entstandene Lücke wird vor allem durch Erdgas gefüllt. Seit 2014 ist der Anteil am Strommix von 13 auf knapp 37 Prozent gestiegen. Doch auch regenerative Quellen gewinnen an Bedeutung : Wind und Solar zusammen sind im selben Zeitraum von 15 auf 27 Prozent geklettert.  

Stromerzeugung 2020 in Prozent 

Seit Jahren konstant ist dagegen der Ölanteil an der Energie- und Stromversorgung. Das hat strukturelle Gründe : Griechenland war gerade bei fossilen Rohstoffen stets stark von Importen abhängig, da die Vorkommen im Inland begrenzt sind. Laut IEA-Daten wurde 2010 nur 34 Prozent des Primärenergieverbrauchs, also des Energieverbrauchs aller Sektoren inklusive Stromversorgung, in dem Mittelmeerstaat generiert. 96 Prozent der importierten Energie entfiel auf Kohle, Gas und Öl, vor allem aus Russland, dem Iran und Saudi-Arabien. Inzwischen bezieht das Land zwar deutlich weniger Kohle aus dem Ausland, die Ölmenge ist aber nahezu unverändert geblieben. Mit dem Ausbau der Erneuerbaren soll auch diese Abhängigkeit abnehmen. 

Weniger Kohle, das ist auch für die küstenfernen Regionen das erklärte Ziel : Ursprünglich sollte das letzte Kraftwerk 2028 vom Netz gehen. Im Rahmen des Post-Covid-19-Aufbauprogramms „Greece 2.0“ gab Ministerpräsident Kyriakos Mitsotakis Ende April 2021 jedoch ein neues Ziel bekannt. Nun soll bereits 2025 endgültig Schluss sein mit der Kohle, ein Großteil der Kraftwerke wird schon bis 2023 abgeschaltet.

Massiver Ausbau der Windkraft- und Solarkapazitäten

Um die Ziele des nationalen Energie- und Klimaplans (NECP) zu erreichen, muss jedoch mehr passieren : Ziel ist, die Treibhausgasemissionen des gesamten Energiesektors  bis 2050 auf null zu senken. Die Erneuerbaren müssen dazu schnell massiv wachsen. Erst Anfang 2021 hat das Parlament deshalb das Klimaschutzgesetz noch einmal nachgeschärft. 2030 sollen nun 67 Prozent – statt, wie bisher geplant, 61 Prozent – des verbrauchten Stroms aus regenerativen Quellen stammen. Zuletzt lag der Wert knapp unter der 30-Prozent-Marke und damit etwas niedriger als beim inländisch erzeugten Strom – Grund für die Diskrepanz sind Energieimporte. Was die Zielsetzung konkret bedeutet, rechnete die Generalsekretärin für Energie und mineralische Rohstoffe, Alexandra Sdoukou, im Januar in einer Rede auf einer Energiekonferenz im vor : „Heute sind etwa 10,5 Gigawatt (GW) Erneuerbarer Energie in Betrieb. Um die NECP-Ziele zu erreichen, benötigen wir bis 2030 19 GW. Wir müssen in den nächsten zehn Jahren 8,5 GW hinzufügen, durchschnittlich 850 Megawatt (MW) pro Jahr.

Um die Ziele des nationalen Energie- und Klimaplans (NECP) zu erreichen, muss jedoch mehr passieren : Ziel ist, die Treibhausgasemissionen des gesamten Energiesektors  bis 2050 auf null zu senken. Die Erneuerbaren müssen dazu schnell massiv wachsen. Erst Anfang 2021 hat das Parlament deshalb das Klimaschutzgesetz noch einmal nachgeschärft. 2030 sollen nun 67 Prozent – statt, wie bisher geplant, 61 Prozent – des verbrauchten Stroms aus regenerativen Quellen stammen. Zuletzt lag der Wert knapp unter der 30-Prozent-Marke und damit etwas niedriger als beim inländisch erzeugten Strom – Grund für die Diskrepanz sind Energieimporte. Was die Zielsetzung konkret bedeutet, rechnete die Generalsekretärin für Energie und mineralische Rohstoffe, Alexandra Sdoukou, im Januar in einer Rede auf einer Energiekonferenz im vor : „Heute sind etwa 10,5 Gigawatt (GW) Erneuerbarer Energie in Betrieb. Um die NECP-Ziele zu erreichen, benötigen wir bis 2030 19 GW. Wir müssen in den nächsten zehn Jahren 8,5 GW hinzufügen, durchschnittlich 850 Megawatt (MW) pro Jahr.“

Wir befürworten diese Maßnahmen und einen derartigen Ausbau an Erneuerbaren Energien und möchten damit auch einen wichtigen Beitrag zur Umsetzung der Energiewende leisten. Hier besteht noch großes Potential, das noch nicht ausgeschöpft ist.

Auch hier haben wir mehrere größere Projekte im Bereich Wind- und Solar-Energie im Portfolio und suchen geeignete Partner als Investoren, sprechen Sie einfach mit uns